How To: How a Breakfast Badass Makes Eggs: Scrambled AND Hard-Boiled (Without Cracking the Shell)

How a Breakfast Badass Makes Eggs: Scrambled AND Hard-Boiled (Without Cracking the Shell)

How a Breakfast Badass Makes Eggs: Scrambled AND Hard-Boiled (Without Cracking the Shell)

Eggs are one of the most versatile foods imaginable. They can be cooked in tons of different ways, eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, and go with just about anything. Most of us have hard-boiled and scrambled eggs before, but have you ever thought about combining the two?

That looks pretty good, doesn't it? But it's not exactly the kind of scrambled and hard-boiled eggs combo I'm referring to. And thankfully, this isn't what I'm talking about either...

Image via tfster.com

No, even though balut may look like a scrambled mess inside of an egg (yuck!), I'm talking specifically about what's called a "Golden egg", which you can see below.

Image via instructables.com

Instructables user ATTILAtheHUNgry spent some time in Japan and learned the art of scrambling an egg without cracking the shell. His process doesn't require much—a raw egg and one leg from a pair of stockings—but you'll probably have to practice a few times to get it right.

If you succeed, this is what you'll end up with:

Image via instructables.com

Start by placing the egg inside the stocking, right in the middle. Grab each end and twist it 20-25 times, then pull the ends tight so it spins. Repeat this about ten times.

If you want to be sure you did it right, take the egg into a dark room and hold a flashlight to it. If the egg looks yellow, it's not scrambled yet. When it's done properly, the egg should glow a bright red color.

Image via instructables.com

To cook, just put the eggs in a pot with just enough water to cover them, then bring it to a boil for about 6 minutes. When they're done, throw them in an ice bath to stop them from overcooking.

When it comes time to peeling, I recommend the "non-peeling" method, because special eggs deserve special attention.

Of course, you don't have to hard boil them—you can cook your scrambled eggs any way you please. Check out ATTILAtheHUNgry's tutorial for more details and some more ideas for what to do with them.

Photo by Richard Semik/Shutterstock

9 Comments

The single-style egg-cook just isn't good enough anymore. Except for poached. Love me some Eggs Benedict.

This doesn't work even a little bit. I did it EXACTLY as shown and all I ended up with was eggs that were insanely difficult to open and looked like they were pock marked (think a badly acne scarred face) and not scrambled. Search for "twitchythekid" on Photobucket to see the result.

As you see... awful. I'm sure the poster would argue that I didn't do it right/enough but I can assure you that I followed video instructions exactly. Well, egg salad, here I come.

Bummer. Looks like it didn't spin enough. You might check out Ben's approach as he did the spin using a sleeve instead of a stocking.

I tried this tonight and majority of the eggs cracked during boil and came out exactly as the photo posted above. I feel like I was trolled hardcore. :(

Use the flashlight method to check if you've actually broken the yolk. I've had three eggs scramble in the shell and one explode in the stocking from spinning too fast and one hit my counter top. Scrambler beware!

I wonder if egg quality has anything to do with the varying results? Gonna give it a try regardless.

Omg now i'm really sad, seeing that poor dead chick inside the egg. I just wanted a recipe. Why did you have to show that???

That's balut -- a delicacy in some regions. I've filed it under "Probably will never try."

i ried thie 3 times it didnt work what a waste of time

Share Your Thoughts

  • Hot
  • Latest