Halloween Food Hacks: These Organic Pumpkinsteins Don't Need Any Carving

These Organic Pumpkinsteins Don't Need Any Carving

We've already told you how the Japanese pioneered growing specially shaped watermelons (including square, heart, and Godzilla egg). Now it turns out an organic farmer just north of Los Angeles is doing them one better.

Tony Dighera has figured out a way to grow "Pumpkinsteins."

Image by Michael Owen Baker/Los Angeles Daily News

These pumpkins, which sell for $75 apiece wholesale, are grown in special molds that bear the likeness of Dr. Frankenstein's creation, and are so believable that many people think they have to be made of wax.

Image by Monica Almeida/The New York Times

This isn't Dighera's first foray into the world of growing specially shaped produce. He's also produced those famous square- and heart-shaped watermelons and even grown ones for Whole Foods that bear the company's logo in the side. All of these are produced through plastic molds and lots of experimentation. (It took him almost $400,000 and playing around with 27 varieties of pumpkin before successfully growing the current version.)

Image by Michael Owen Baker/Los Angeles Daily News

These monster-faced pumpkins, however, turned out to be easier than growing the melons, primarily because they're for decoration only—no one was fussing about their taste.

Image by Monica Almeida/The New York Times

Although it's too late in the season, you can start planning ahead for next year and try to grow your very own spooky-faced pumpkins. It's an involved process: you'll need to sculpt the faces and then learn how to make your own molds. (They need to be breathable and let enough light in, so it might take you some experimenting, too.) However, you'll have the unique joy of your very own spooky pumpkins that are completely one-of-a-kind.

In the meantime, you might be able to pick up an authentic Pumpkinstein over at Gelson's or Whole Foods, but it could cost you up to $125. Would you spend that much for a specialty pumpkin?

If you do splurge on one of these pumkinsteins, make good use of it, before it rots. You could always slap on some glow-in-the-dark paint or steampunk it, among other things.

Cover image via Monica Almeida/The New York Times

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