How To: 6 Delicious Ways to Use Up Leftover Champagne

6 Delicious Ways to Use Up Leftover Champagne

6 Delicious Ways to Use Up Leftover Champagne

Unlike wine, you can't re-cork or stopper leftover bubbly after you've opened it, but all is not lost even if you haven't managed to finish every last drop. You can use your leftover champagne to make light-as-air crêpes or pancakes, to create a detox face mask, to cook seafood and rice, or to make dips and salad dressings.

#1. Make Light-as-Air Champagne Crêpes

Leftover champagne lends these crêpes a sweet taste and helps them cook up extra light and with exceptionally crisp, lacy edges.

Ingredients:

  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¾ cup champagne
  • 1¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil and melted butter, combined

Instructions:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, and champagne.
  2. Whisk in flour.
  3. Add salt and butter/oil mixture and then whisk quickly for a few minutes.
  4. Let batter sit for one hour in the refrigerator.
  5. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Brush it with rest of butter/oil mixture.
  6. When skillet is hot but not smoking, pour a small amount of batter in to make a thin crepe.
  7. Cook until golden, about one minute for first side and 30 seconds for the other side.
  8. Continue with the rest of batter, covering cooked crêpes to keep warm.
  9. Fill or top with sweet or savory toppings.

If you want thick and fluffy champagne pancakes instead, follow this recipe from Veggie and the Beast.

#2. Make Champagne-Soaked Mussels

I love mussels cooked in beer or wine, and champagne might be even better. It's simple to make this and the flavor is incredible.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs fresh mussels
  • 2 tbsp garlic, onions, or shallots, minced (alternatively, you can use/combine other diced aromatics like celery or carrots)
  • 2 cups leftover champagne, more or less
  • Herbs, salt, and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Clean your mussels well. (You can get a good guide here.)
  2. In a large pot over medium-low heat, sauté some garlic and onions (or shallots) in olive oil.
  3. Add some herbs and salt and pepper and cook for a couple minutes.
  4. Turn up the heat and add the mussels and the champagne.
  5. Bring to a boil and cover for about five minutes, or until the mussels open.
  6. Serve with some good, crusty bread.

#3. Make a Lovely Champagne Vinaigrette

This vinaigrette works well on any green or tossed salad, but works especially well on salads with a lot of fruit and nuts. It's light and brings out the natural sweetness in these ingredients. The champagne adds a vibrant, piquant taste.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp champagne or balsamic vinegar
  • 1½ tbsp champagne
  • ½ tbsp sugar, or more and less to taste
  • sea salt and pepper to taste

Combine ingredients in shallow bowl and whisk together. Alternatively, you can put all the ingredients in a sealed jar and shake it.

#4. Champagne Risotto

Make this creamy risotto dish by Giada de Laurentis with your leftover champagne. In just about half an hour, you'll have a meal to remember.

Image via Food Network

#5. Turn It into a Gourmet French Spread & Dip

All you need to make fromage fort is some champagne (or wine), leftover cheese, and some garlic. It's delicious, addictive, and makes good use of your cocktail party leftovers. (Full instructions here.)

#6. Make Chicken Au Champagne

This gorgeous chicken recipe sounds and tastes grand, but it's simple and easy to make in a cast-iron skillet.

Image via Cooking with Curls

Bonus: Make a Champagne Face Mask

You might be hungover from the amount of champagne you drank the night before, and if so, then your skin is probably suffering from some dehydration and sleep deprivation, too. Make good use of that leftover champagne with this face mask from the Glamorganic Goddess to combat your skin hangover.

Image via Glamorganic Goddess

Not only has champagne been shown to be an antioxidant powerhouse, the grape seed extract it contains is even more powerful than vitamins C and E, according to cosmetic chemist Joseph Cincotta.

Got any of your own hacks or recipes for leftover champagne? Share them with us in the comments below, or over on our Facebook page.

Photos by Naomi Imatome-Yun/Food Hacks (unless otherwise specified)

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